asker

austeeno asked: What does guts eat?

Like all tegus should have, Guts has an extremely varied diet.  He generally eats:  Ground buffalo, fish (whole and fillets), ground venison, offal, eggs (scrambled, soft boiled, and fried), fruit (mangos, peaches, grapes, papaya, prickly pear cactus fruit, cherries, plums, strawberries, blackberries, currants, blueberries, figs, ect), honey comb, frog legs, insects, quail parts, and whole prey items such as rats and mice.  Plus supplementation, of course.  He also drinks a veggie smoothie I make for myself on occasion.

He’s pretty fun to feed, so I enjoy shopping for him.  He’s extremely picky however, so that limits what I can buy.  He doesn’t like beef, turkey, apples, pears, any shellfish, any mollusk, watermelon, and generally doesn’t care for chicken either.

markscherz:

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).
Except.
Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.
So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.
There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).
Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.
IOW?
Reptiles are fascinating.

A similar situation is seen in Lepidodactylus lugubris. In this parthenogenic species, one in ~20 (my numbers might be off, don’t quote me) individuals is male. The females of course cannot be fertilised by the male, being parthenogenic, but copulation still seems to stimulate them to lay. In the absence of the male, females will apparently engage in lesbian copulations that also have this stimulatory function.

As far as I am aware males don’t typically exist in L. lugubris either and they are generally regarded as an all-female species though it appears male-phenotypes have occurred rarely in the species.  I found this paper that has a nice summary of the texts I’d read previously as well as some personal experience with a male-phenotype animal.  The wild collected male-phenotype discussed in the above link, is discussed in this article here.  He was thought to be sterile.That said I do keep L. lugibris personally and have indeed noted that females kept alone do lay eggs, but they are all infertile eggs that never yield hatchlings and only when placed with other animals so they can engage in their pseudo-copulation (aka lesbian lizard sex) do fertile eggs occur and yield hatchlings.  So it does appear to be necessary for them to engage in some type of sexual behavior for them to produce viable eggs, which is interesting to note.Also, a picture, because pictures of mourning geckos are wonderful.

markscherz:

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).

Except.

Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.

So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.

There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).

Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.

IOW?

Reptiles are fascinating.

A similar situation is seen in Lepidodactylus lugubris. In this parthenogenic species, one in ~20 (my numbers might be off, don’t quote me) individuals is male. The females of course cannot be fertilised by the male, being parthenogenic, but copulation still seems to stimulate them to lay. In the absence of the male, females will apparently engage in lesbian copulations that also have this stimulatory function.

As far as I am aware males don’t typically exist in L. lugubris either and they are generally regarded as an all-female species though it appears male-phenotypes have occurred rarely in the species.  I found this paper that has a nice summary of the texts I’d read previously as well as some personal experience with a male-phenotype animal.  The wild collected male-phenotype discussed in the above link, is discussed in this article here.  He was thought to be sterile.

That said I do keep L. lugibris personally and have indeed noted that females kept alone do lay eggs, but they are all infertile eggs that never yield hatchlings and only when placed with other animals so they can engage in their pseudo-copulation (aka lesbian lizard sex) do fertile eggs occur and yield hatchlings.  So it does appear to be necessary for them to engage in some type of sexual behavior for them to produce viable eggs, which is interesting to note.

Also, a picture, because pictures of mourning geckos are wonderful.

image

reptibarb:

duel-styx:

scalestails:

duel-styx:

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

See: Species that can actually be kept on sand.
Really cute little thing! What does he/she eat? Aren’t they ant eaters?

They are ant eaters.  She eats primarily ants, along with tiny roaches and tiny crickets.

You gotta supplement the tiny crickets and roaches no?

Yes, that is primarily the reason she gets them.  That and I am unclear on how much of their diet is made up of other insects.

reptibarb:

duel-styx:

scalestails:

duel-styx:

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.

For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

See: Species that can actually be kept on sand.

Really cute little thing! What does he/she eat? Aren’t they ant eaters?

They are ant eaters.  She eats primarily ants, along with tiny roaches and tiny crickets.

You gotta supplement the tiny crickets and roaches no?

Yes, that is primarily the reason she gets them.  That and I am unclear on how much of their diet is made up of other insects.

asker

betta-adventures asked: Uuuuutaaahhh???

Yup.  :3

Guts enjoying his new bed some more.  He’s so adorable when he stretches out.

scalestails:

duel-styx:

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

See: Species that can actually be kept on sand.
Really cute little thing! What does he/she eat? Aren’t they ant eaters?

They are ant eaters.  She eats primarily ants, along with tiny roaches and tiny crickets.

scalestails:

duel-styx:

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.

For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

See: Species that can actually be kept on sand.

Really cute little thing! What does he/she eat? Aren’t they ant eaters?

They are ant eaters.  She eats primarily ants, along with tiny roaches and tiny crickets.

Pancake demonstrating her adorable and natural bedtime behavior to sleep buried in the sand.  I hadn’t turned her lights off yet, but apparently I was late because it was time for bed anyway!  So I snapped a few photos quickly then turned out her lights so she could get some shut eye.

Pancake demonstrating her adorable and natural bedtime behavior to sleep buried in the sand.  I hadn’t turned her lights off yet, but apparently I was late because it was time for bed anyway!  So I snapped a few photos quickly then turned out her lights so she could get some shut eye.

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

This is Pancake, she is a young CBB Desert Horned Lizard aka “Horny toad” or Phrynosoma platyrhinos.  They are native to Utah, legal to own in the state, and upon having the ability to buy a captive born and bred animal at the Wasatch Reptile Expo in 2014, I did so.

For anyone curious she is on Jurassic Sand Products’ “Jurassic Sand” which is harvested from, you guessed it, right here in Utah as well.

Guts ready to give his new bed a test run.  Tired teglu is tired.
(That noise in the background is his humidifier.)

tser:

Floppy gecko crest rubs. It’s Niji! *how soothing* Massages for the lizard overlords.

Aka “How to Pet Your Gecko”